duane

18 Mar 2006 1,547 views
 
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photoblog image London Eye

London Eye

This week's theme: From a point & shoot

For the coming week, I want to illustrate that you don't need to spend £1000s on an expensive DSLR, and what's possible to achieve with a point & shoot camera.

Most London-based photographers have at least 1 photo of the London Eye on their photoblogs, so here's my spin of it. For those do don't know what the London Eye is, it's the biggest ferris wheel in the world (135m) - a car can fit in each of the capsules above.

Tip of the day: Getting blue skies. London is often described as a very grey city. The skies are often overcast and there's not a lot of sun here. But I've managed to get nice blue skies like in this photo whether in winter or in summer.

It's actually really simple - just wait for a break in the clouds, and make sure that the sun is located behind you. This not only helps prevent white washed out skies, but also improves the colour of your subject. The location of the sun guarantees it will be well lit and not in the shadows. Shooting with the sun to your back used to be the #1 rule of photography in the early 1900s. Now with film being so cheap, or even free (with digital), people don't give much thought to it when taking photos. But it's an important rule, and remains relevant even in the digital age.

What if you can't avoid shooting into the sun? In such cases, try to get less of the sky in the photo. Or avoid having any sky in it at all! While the human eye adapts to a wide range of brightness, cameras can't. Either you get a very dark subject, or a white sky. The key is to angle your camera down a bit, and avoid the sky if you can.

London Eye

This week's theme: From a point & shoot

For the coming week, I want to illustrate that you don't need to spend £1000s on an expensive DSLR, and what's possible to achieve with a point & shoot camera.

Most London-based photographers have at least 1 photo of the London Eye on their photoblogs, so here's my spin of it. For those do don't know what the London Eye is, it's the biggest ferris wheel in the world (135m) - a car can fit in each of the capsules above.

Tip of the day: Getting blue skies. London is often described as a very grey city. The skies are often overcast and there's not a lot of sun here. But I've managed to get nice blue skies like in this photo whether in winter or in summer.

It's actually really simple - just wait for a break in the clouds, and make sure that the sun is located behind you. This not only helps prevent white washed out skies, but also improves the colour of your subject. The location of the sun guarantees it will be well lit and not in the shadows. Shooting with the sun to your back used to be the #1 rule of photography in the early 1900s. Now with film being so cheap, or even free (with digital), people don't give much thought to it when taking photos. But it's an important rule, and remains relevant even in the digital age.

What if you can't avoid shooting into the sun? In such cases, try to get less of the sky in the photo. Or avoid having any sky in it at all! While the human eye adapts to a wide range of brightness, cameras can't. Either you get a very dark subject, or a white sky. The key is to angle your camera down a bit, and avoid the sky if you can.

comments (15)

  • Suby
  • 18 Mar 2006, 00:36
Urrrrrrggggghhh, crop off the bit bottom left, does nothing for the image. Then we will have a better image. The red and the camera (if thats what it is) is a big distraction. Other than that it's a nice image. Love the sky
Is it really the largest in the world? I'd check that fact if I were you.
The Maven: The London Eye was the largest in 1999. Though I just checked and found that Shanghai built an even larger one in 2005. Sigh...
UK is too expensive for me to go now, so I'll wait for the Singapore's Eye to be built. They have been talking about it, I even saw the artist impression of it. It will be near the Marina Bay.
The Maven: Yep, I'm really looking forward to that one too. Should be quite an impressive sight. I wonder how large it will be in comparison to these other "mega wheels".
  • dave
  • 18 Mar 2006, 07:18
Nice shot Duane - that look fun! cheers smile
  • Micki
  • 18 Mar 2006, 12:47
What a great week of tips, and photos! Pat on the back to you!
For sure they will build it bigger than the Shanghai ferris wheel... smile
Lovely picture ! Nice composition !
I agree with Suby about the clutter in the bottom left... I like the idea you have of how you composed the capsules though.
  • Dia
  • 18 Mar 2006, 19:42
hehe very nice, I'll give it a spin when I visit some friends in London this Summer wink
  • dfk;hg'jil
  • 18 Mar 2006, 21:12
dg'kgf'kld l'kfl'e'q e;jo
It's just a little overphotographed, Duane! Technicals look good.
Cool shot!
  • Roger
  • 20 Mar 2006, 01:00
Cool shot. I don't know what's up with the London Eye. I have seen tons of Eye shots the last couple of weeks. I had one up a couple of months ago.
  • Shuva
  • 20 Mar 2006, 07:34
Nice shot, I would have cropped of the left red thingy!Point and shoot can do good job. You proved it.
Under normal circumstances I would say this is a good way to shoot a common subject differently, especially as it's done with a point-and-shoot. But after seeing this one from asiko, (http://asiko.shutterchance.com/photoblog/556.htm) it looks a little tame by comparison.
Great tip. and great shot of the wheel. I guess this is a popular attraction, although I have never seen it! Well done.

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